The UK housing charity Shelter has announced results of a recent survey which show 1.97 million adults aged between 20 and 34 are living at home with their parents even though they are in employment and have gone on to call on the government to do more to address the inequities in the housing market.


The survey found that 48% of the young adults who are living with their parents do so because they can’t afford to move out, either to rent or buy their own home.


These adults are being forced to “live like teenagers” said Shelter’s Roger Harding whilst Campbell Robb, chief executive of Shelter, said: “The 'clipped wing generation' are finding themselves with no choice but to remain living with mum and dad well into adulthood, as they struggle to find a home of their own...”


“Rather than pumping more money into schemes like Help to Buy, we need bolder action that will meet the demand for affordable homes and not inflate prices further.”


“From helping small local builders find the finance they need, to investing in a new generation of part rent, part buy homes, the solutions to our housing shortage are there for the taking.”


“Politicians of all parties must now put stable homes for the next generation at the top of the agenda.”


Areas of the UK that need most action:


Shelter has uncovered several areas that are in particular need of an increase in supply of housing due to a significantly high proportion of adults living with their parents. These are:

 

  • Castle Point in Essex 45% working adults live with parents
  • Knowsley in Merseyside 42% working adults live with parents
  • Solihull 38% of working adults live with parents

 

Shelter is clearly demonstrating the need for the housing market to be kick started so the “clipped wing generation” can go onto fly the nest.


The construction industry has been crying out for some time now for government help and direction to get more projects underway so we can do our bit to help the nation’s housing market rebalance and really drive forward our fragile recovery.